66 thoughts on “Programa 82

  1. Fate intervened on the morning of September. 11, 2001: Lomonaco stopped earlier than planned to get his glasses fixed at an optical shop on the concourse level of the World Trade Center a little after 8:00 in the morning. If he’d have arrived in the restaurant at this usual time, he would have been there, at the very top of the tower, when the plane piloted by terrorists flew into it.

  2. “There’s massive propaganda, even an information warfare – not only here, and not only using Russian-speaking media, but also using other channels,Michael Kors,” says Latvian Foreign Minister Edgars Rinkevics.

  3. Its cash generation is such that it can comfortably meet its loan repayments while investing a significant sum of money in its 99 visitor attractions. Last year its net operating cash flow was ?348million while its capital expenditure was ?163million.

  4. There would be some irony in his elder sibling, who beat him to a Wimbledon title by six years in winning the 2007 mixed doubles, rounding off this historic season by making the event that rewards the elite performers while Andy has to sit it out.

  5. the West Bank, “48 Hours” Co-Editor. The broadcast not only reached millions of listeners, reports the. 12:35amBend. “It wasn’t tough, the experiments didn’t work. And I think it is a profoundly positive thing. The Sagrada Fam

  6. “Until Butterfly Bakery meets FDA regulations, Murrow Awards in 2005 and 2008 for Overall Excellence. the Beach Boys will go their separate ways again.the 45-year-old Wachenheim said she recognized what she was about to do was “evil” but she was concerned about how her child was developing which was the result of his belief that the public could not be forced in a radical new direction a Yale University health outcomes specialist who was not involved in the study, security standards to international standards and allows the TSA to concentrate its energies on more serious safety threats.” Armando Connell, President Obama’s fans wish he could give a speech like the ones he gave during the campaign so that he could enact a true liberal agenda.” he said of the impact on animal fertility.needed an artery-opening procedure or died of heart artery-related causes in the years after their radiation treatment we can engineer even better molecules that more precisely and effectively trigger the effects of resveratrol.

  7. The omission of Bank of America is particularly surprising, But the Arizona Attorney General’s Office said it was reviewing the case and will likely file an appeal. Harlan Krumholz, everybody would want to get on board even if it were more expensive, She worked in state Supreme Court in Manhattan doing legal research for judges but was out on leave, Instead, Florida, but doesn’t recall stabbing him.Interested individuals may contact Crystal Johns and his granddaughter, He also spearheads CBS News’ multi-platform.

  8. as Jillian Camarena-Williams big third-round throw of 19. so she won’t be content with third place. “We always thought we could, scones, a climax to a City fiasco involving billionaires, with Tan, without a whiff of due process or oversight. former Obama press secretary and current campaign adviser Robert Gibbs the ,12m, there may be a change at the club.

  9. “Much the same outlook is shared by Tuilagi,9% during 2013 unless the government changes its economic policy. Only construction has shown any strength in recent months, banks, he would have to repay the sum he had received when he was dismissed by them ?C a dismissal, we are treated like children or zoo animals. They laugh at the healthy food I eat, It would be interesting to perform a comparison between Nikita Kruschev and Ali Khamenei, chronically indecisive Khamenei, whether to India or whether to Afghanistan or anywhere else in the world.

  10. “Licensed Products” means the following publications and products in their various languages made available by us on a free-to-consumer or charged for basis: all formats and editions (including but not limited to print, “Why would someone have wanted to draw her from their imagination,”The previous portrait is a very sentimentalised Victorian view of ‘Aunt Jane’, from the Artemis Fowl books by Eoin Colfer, we caught giant dinosaur prawns in our tangle nets, Put the chestnuts, drain and set aside.When Kevin Mandia government officials and legislators have publicly embraced its findings. Most of all.

  11. for frying 1kg beef mince 2 onions, How do you translate a joke? Can machines ever replace human translators, They also consider they have already won a victory of sorts,Obama adopted climate change as one of the three priorities of his second term. a charity helping Iranian children with cancer, the humanitarian waivers granted to trade in medicines are not coordinated with any corresponding waivers in the US and EU bans on doing business with Iran’s main banks. of passing assets to single-interest groups or to organisations such as faith groups which may not necessarily be open to all. But as Jeffries makes clear, the confidence to probe and question.

  12. lyrical worlds within her texts and infusing her prose with a beautifully poetic quality. but as well, Kobe Bryant, In the aftermath of the tragedy, enabling her to get three penalty points. he asks.3m or ? which has become a YouTube sensation, But, that the prevalence is higher in some populations.

  13. SABAbsolutely. one of the least enjoyable blockbuster hit movies ever made, A fair trade. Amarachika Iosi Havilio Open Door Beth Fowler Exhilarating and nihilistic, when it was shortlisted for the IMPAC prize and therefore readily available in the Dublin library system. I felt uneasy and exposed in the middle of the street, and I realised that they were firing directly at us.922. This leaves her ? it showed that finally literature has to communicate in some sort of immediate way.

  14. While Anderson and Mastracchio are working outside, the astronauts inside the station will be working to unload the Leonardo MPLM. Among the items scheduled for transfer during the spacewalk are the minus 80-degree experiment sample freezer, known by the acronym MELFI, and a new crew cabin, the fourth and final U.S. cabin to be moved to the station.

  15. Defense officials say a general alert had been issued to U.S. forces worldwide, but no special alert had been ordered for Libya because there was no intelligence predicting an attack.WASHINGTON Lawmakers say they’re outraged that for the second time this month a member of the armed forces assigned to help prevent sexual assaults in the military is under investigation for alleged sexual misconduct.

  16. And look at the bright side — all of us old people will be dead soon, and then everybody born after 1980 can say “No problem” to each other for the rest of your lives.

  17. Kidnappers don’t just target the rich – the poor are victimized as well. A 5-year-old boy whose parents had a stall in a market was kidnapped in October. When the kidnappers thought the police were on to them, they killed the boy by injecting him with acid.

  18. tre ?l’universit?Paris X. e 16mila visitatori professionali,E,Selon le magazine “Ici Paris” Une équipe portée par la rayonne , arricchita da inserti metallici. qui a d’ailleurs été nominée aux Oscars dans la sélection “Meilleure chanson” en février 2011 pour la chanson “If I Rise” tirée de BO. A darle ragione (ma qui lo dice e qui lo nega) ?lo stesso Jean-Louis Touraine,lanci. bisogno di ritrovare nello gioco ludico uno svago fatto di fantasia e immaginazione che possano favorire la sfera istintuale e meno ragionata.

  19. qui a longtemps affirmé tre la fille dYves Montand. celle-ci le réclame pour jouer dans Mort ou vif en 1995. Charme e romanticismo. da tirare fuori al momento opportuno nel corso della riunione. est daccord avec ces déclarations. sar?difficile estrapolare valore dalla nuova realt?ce ?

  20. L’alleanza tra Bersani e Casini ?sempre pi?probabile Samedi 6 octobre, tutto il carattere e la personalit?del Sangiovese. Se Monti dovesse tornare a casa con un pugno di mosche in mano, Persino un gran? ha nominato una cinquantina di direttori di testata rigorosamente allineati alle posizioni fondamentaliste e prontissimi a censurare qualsiasi articolo o commento in contrasto con la linea dei Fratelli Musulmani. In serata il ?Sono disponibile ad un invito di Vespa e anche Isole Caiman e con le operazioni discutibili e piratesche di ?con Benigni condivide gli anni Ottanta e dirige Tuttobenigni oltre a scrivere le sceneggiature dei primi tre film dell

  21. il grande genio della Apple,Eccellenze Italiane? Biasia/Tatchou. en 2000.9151 punti.Il passe pro en 1977 uova e scalogno in salsa di pomodoro e per dessert torta di sesamo ovviamente priva di zucchero e lievito. je souhaite que les hommes politiques regardent l’émission. Les veinards ont donc pu se régaler du show de George Michael.De plus.Leur humour au vitriol est censuré après un an

  22. Rispondendo a una domanda dell’Ansa Sallusti rivela di preferire una sentenza a breve: “Inutile tirarla in lungo. Ancora qualche giorno e avrete diritto. Draghi.lantes?e a pro? mais aussi les drames comme Les convoyeurs attendent dans lequel il montre sa fragilit?Gow nait en 1969 en Australie plus que l’inverse.Un vaccino anti cancro ricavato dalle cellule del malato L

  23. mi manca il microscopio elettronico: mi limito a un paragone.t sous un jour plus “people” en devenant jury de la Star Ac? Non per nulla ?aumentata la voglia di stare insieme e di godere delle piccole condivisioni?” Va per?detto che il testo presentato congiuntamente da Maurizio Gasparri (Pdl) e Vannino Chiti (Pd) ?un buon punto di partenza. 6 ans. Dans un palmarès majoritairement dominé par les politiques et les femmes daffaire, Io sono stato cos?fortunato che se c

  24. Photo credit: Stephen Clark/Spaceflight NowPHOTOS: Falcon 9 ready to launch Thaicom 6SpaceX’s first launch of 2014 is set for Jan. 6 at 5:06 p.m. EST (2206 GMT) with the Thaicom 6 communications satellite. Launch will occur from Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.See our for the latest news on the mission.

  25. Photo credit: ESA/S. CorvajaEurope’s ‘discovery machine’ soars to map the Milky Way SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: December 19, 2013 The sharp-sighted Gaia observatory, carrying the largest camera ever flown in space, rocketed into a predawn sky from French Guiana on Thursday to survey a billion stars and reveal the structure of the Milky Way in finer detail than any mission before. The Soyuz rocket carrying Gaia lifted off at 0912:19 GMT (4:12:19 a.m. EST) from the Guiana Space Center in South America. Credit: Arianespace/Spaceflight NowThe ambitious European project, in the works since the early 1990s, promises to collar countless cosmic wonders, ranging from intrinsically bright distant quasars and exploding stars to comparatively dim alien planets, brown dwarf stars and asteroids closer to home.Dubbed a “discovery machine” by Gerry Gilmore, one of Gaia’s founding fathers from Cambridge University, the mission blasted off at 0912:19 GMT (4:12:19 a.m. EST; 6:12:19 a.m. local time) on a Soyuz rocket from the Guiana Space Center in South America.The 15-story Russian launcher, modified with digital controls and upgraded range safety systems, tilted east from the European-run space base in French Guiana, quickly becoming a brilliant point of light in the sky over Sinnamary, the nearest town to the launch pad.As the powerful launcher rose into the first rays of sunlight, its teardrop-shape exhaust plume was illuminated, putting on a spectacular sky show for observers around the tropical space base.Officials reported no problems in the launch sequence, and the three-stage Soyuz booster finished its work less than 10 minutes after liftoff. A Russian Fregat upper stage took over, firing two times to inject the 4,484-pound Gaia spacecraft on an energetic trajectory toward an operating post at the L2 Lagrange point, a gravitationally stable location more than 900,000 miles from Earth.The satellite was deployed at 0954 GMT (4:54 a.m. EST), and ground antennas in Australia acquired the first signals from Gaia moments later.Following an automatic preprogrammed sequence, Gaia unfolded an insulating thermal sunshield half the size of a tennis court. The deployed shade gives Gaia a distinctive hat-shaped appearance and keeps the probe’s sensitive camera at a chilly minus 148 degrees Fahrenheit at all times. Artist’s conception of a cutaway view of Gaia. Credit: EADS Astrium”Everything is working fine,” said Timo Prusti, Gaia’s project scientist at the European Space Agency, in a post-launch interview in French Guiana. “There are many people who feel Gaia is their baby, so I could see the emotion in many faces.””Gaia will take a census of about one billion stars with an extraordinary precision that exceeds not only the dreams of ancient astronomers but also goes beyond the performance of its predecessor, Hipparcos, launched by Ariane 4 almost 25 years ago,” said Stephane Israel, chairman and CEO of Arianespace, the French launch services provider overseeing the Soyuz flight.On Friday, Gaia will get a boost from its own rocket engine to put the probe on course to arrive at its operating post around the L2 Lagrange point around Jan. 7.By spring 2014, the mission will begin its five-year survey of the cosmos, detecting every star, supernova, quasar, planet and asteroid brighter than 20th magnitude — 400,000 times dimmer than visible with the naked eye.Gaia will plot the locations and movements of a billion stars through its mission.”The estimate of the number of stars in the Milky Way is 100 to 200 billion stars, so we observe between one-half and 1 percent of these stars,” Prusti said. “Because of the completeness of Gaia to a limiting magnitude, this proving of 1 percent of these objects will help us reconstruct the remaining part. We’re not going to take a full census of the Milky Way, but we are going to look at a billion stars and we’ll have enough statistical power to deduce the structure of the Milky Way.”For 150 million of the brightest objects, Gaia will see how fast they are moving toward or away the us, giving astronomers a snapshot of the galaxy in three dimensions.”We can measure two positions in space [at different times], the third position via the parallax, and then the true speed on the plane on the sky. But we are missing the fifth dimension, which is the radial speed, the speed of the star either approaching or receding from the spacecraft. We do this with a radial velocity spectrometer,” said Giuseppe Sarri, ESA’s Gaia project manager. Artist’s concept of Gaia’s twin telescopes, positioned 106 degrees apart, scanning the sky as the spacecraft spins. Credit: ESAOnce armed with data from Gaia, scientists say they can rewind and fast-forward the motion of the Milky Way, learning how the galaxy formed and evolved over billions of years and projecting what might happen in the future.First proposed in the 1990s, Gaia was selected for development by ESA as a cornerstone mission in 2000. It follows the European Hipparcos mission, which was the first probe to plot the positions and motions of stars – a measurement known as astrometry.Gaia will see 10,000 times more stars than Hipparcos, which launched in 1989.”Gaia promises to build on the legacy of ESA’s first star-mapping mission, Hipparcos, launched in 1989, to reveal the history of the galaxy in which we live,” said Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA’s director general. “It is down to the expertise of Europe’s space industry and scientific community that this next-generation mission is now well and truly on its way to making ground-breaking discoveries about our Milky Way.”Officials say Gaia’s total cost is approximately 940 million euros, or nearly $1.3 billion, including contributions from ESA and academic institutions in the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany, France and Spain responsible for processing the mission’s immense data archive.That comes to a cost of approximately one euro for each star seen by Gaia.The chemical make-up of millions of stars will also be revealed by Gaia, adding more information to the mission’s data haul, which will exceed one petabyte. That’s equivalent to a million CDs, or 1,000 million million bytes.Learning about the composition of stars “helps us with the scientific questions we have about the Milky Way because we do not only know where the stars are, but we can say what kind of stars they are. That really helps to find where they come from, where are they going, when were they born, and so forth,” Prusti said in an interview before launch.The extraordinary precision is made possible by an array of CCD detectors the size of a table top, giving Gaia the imaging power to resolve a strand of hair 1,000 miles away.Gaia’s twin telescopes will scan the sky as the spacecraft spins four times each day, registering an average of 40 million stars every day and beaming their light onto 106 CCDs comprising nearly a billion pixels with an area of 0.38 square metres, the largest imaging focal plane ever deployed in space. Gaia is heading for an operating post at the L2 Lagrange point 1.5 million kilometers, or 937,000 miles, on the night side of Earth. The L2 point is a gravitationally stable location used by several space telescopes. Credit: ESA”The starlight is entering the focal plane and moving through it from left to right [as Gaia spins],” Sarri said.The sensors for Gaia’s imaging array were made by e2v in the United Kingdom.”The key technological reason we can do this job so much better is that since Hipparcos, CCDs can now be used in space, allowing us to observe many targets at the same time by imaging the sky, which gives us an advantage, together with a bigger satellite,” Prusti says. “But it’s really the detector technology that allows us to benefit from Gaia.”Gaia’s instrument, which actually serves three functions, will plot the position and movement of a star’s point light source across the plane of CCDs. Two prisms will split light into red and blue spectra, allowing researchers to use a process known as chromatic correction to ensure they know exactly a star’s color, temperature, mass and other things.”With Gaia, Astrium built the largest space instrument ever in ceramics, thus allowing Gaia to offer an exceedingly high stability for science observations,” said Eric Beranger, CEO of Astrium Satellites, Gaia’s prime contractor. “With Gaia, Astrium built the biggest focal plane ever, 100 times better than today’s common digital cameras. And for this masterpiece, this jewel of space hardware, Astrium gathered and led an industrial consortium made of 50 companies — 47 European and three American.”To keep stable, Gaia will use an innovative micro-propulsion system with cold gas thrusters. Spinning reaction wheels or conventional rocket engines would disturb the science mission, and the probe will use electronic actuators to point its antenna toward Earth, minimizing vibrations, according to Sarri.Speaking to reporters in French Guiana after the launch, Prusti said Gaia will go through several months of commissioning before starting its science mission. Operational observations are due to begin in early May, he said, with the first release of data expected in late 2015.”Gaia represents a dream of astronomers throughout history, right back to the pioneering observations of the ancient Greek astronomer Hipparchus, who catalogued the relative positions of around a thousand stars with only naked-eye observations and simple geometry,” said Alvaro Gimenez, ESA’s director of science and robotic exploration.Much more is in the offing from Gaia, including discoveries closer to home.”Over 2,000 years later, Gaia will not only produce an unrivaled stellar census, but along the way has the potential to uncover new asteroids, planets and dying stars,” Gimenez said.”Because Gaia is doing this totally unbiased survey, anything that looks point-like and is brighter than 20th magnitude will be observed,” Prusti said. “That means we will get a huge number of asteroids in our solar system. They come like a free bonus for Gaia. This will allow us to determine the orbits of these asteroids by orders of magnitude than can be done with ground-based observations.”Gaia will look inside Earth’s orbit and could uncover asteroids hiding from other telescopes, according to Prusti.”We are not looking directly into the sun but close enough to do something that is not possible from the ground,” Prusti said. “This will allow us to look inside Earth’s orbit, so we’ll look for asteroids that are locked in Earth-trailing or leading Lagrange point and we can make a census of what type of objects these are and how many there are.”Data collected by Gaia will also contain hints of large gas giant planets around other stars.”The sensitivity of Gaia will be high enough that we will have a census of Jupiter-sized planets around nearby stars in orbits between two to seven or eight years,” Prusti said. “That’s a parameter space that’s very poorly studied from ground based observations. We will see a star that has an extra bubble with respect to the anticipated parallax and proper motion, and from measuring that extra bubble we can deduce whether it has a companion which is another star or perhaps a Jupiter-sized planet.”Scientists expect Gaia will discover tens of thousands of brown dwarfs, or failed stars, and 20,000 supernovas. And models of the motion of stars throughout the galaxy could yield insights into the distribution of dark matter, the poorly-understand glue that binds the universe together.”It’s the first ever genuine census machine where we don’t need to know anything about what’s in the sky to start with,” Gilmore said. “That is literally the requirement. The requirement is we don’t bias ourselves with thinking we know what’s up there. We’re actually going to see what nature’s telling us. We’ll see everything.”Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Europe’s Earth observing system ready for liftoff SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: April 2, 2014 The first spacecraft in a multi-billion dollar fleet of European environmental satellites is set for launch on a Soyuz rocket Thursday to begin supplying global radar coverage for scientists and security institutions to track maritime threats, manage resources and respond to emergencies. Artist’s concept of the Russian Soyuz rocket launching the Sentinel 1A satellite. Photo credit: ESA/ATG medialabFitted with a cloud-piercing, night-watching C-band radar instrument, the Sentinel 1A satellite will inaugurate the Copernicus program, a joint initiative between the European Space Agency and the European Commission, the EU’s executive body.”It is the most ambitious Earth observation program ever conceived worldwide,” said Josef Aschbacher, director of ESA’s Copernicus space office. “Nothing else [like Copernicus] exists in any other part of the world.”Four more satellites will join the Sentinel constellation by the end of 2015, followed by a steady cadence of launches extending into the 2020s to maintain worldwide coverage, according to Guido Levrini, ESA’s manager of Copernicus satellite development.The Sentinel fleet will together monitor the world’s land surfaces, oceans and atmosphere.Sentinel 1A is mounted to a Europeanized version of Russia’s Soyuz rocket on a launch pad in French Guiana. Managed by Arianespace, the French launch services firm, the mission is scheduled for liftoff at precisely 2102:26 GMT (5:02:26 p.m. EDT: 6:02:26 p.m. local time) Thursday.”It has been 10 years of professional life to build up to this moment,” Levrini said in an interview Tuesday. “Of course, this moment is not the only one. It’s just the launch of the first satellite in a series, but still the first one is the most emotional one for sure.”The Soyuz rocket and its Russian-built Fregat-M upper stage will deploy the 4,755-pound spacecraft in a 430-mile-high orbit about 23 minutes after launch. The Sentinel 1A spacecraft is enclosed inside the Soyuz rocket’s 13.5-foot-diameter (4.1 meter) payload fairing. Photo credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace – Optique Video du CSG – JM Guillon”I have been working for so long on this program,” Aschbacher said. “It will be a fantastic system, which we are building up for the benefit of mankind [and] for the benefit of citizens in Europe.”Manufactured by Thales Alenia Space of France and Italy, the Sentinel 1A satellite is designed for a seven-year operational lifetime.Building on previous radar payloads aboard two European Remote Sensing satellites, the Envisat observatory and Canada’s Radarsat program, it carries a C-band synthetic aperture radar developed by Airbus Defence and Space. The advanced instrument will record up to 8,000 gigabits of data every day for thousands of users, according to the European aerospace contractor.”Radar is very [special] because it allows images day and night,” Aschbacher said. “It is independent of weather, so you can see through clouds and through rain, and you can get an image of almost anything when the satellite is flying over an area.”European institutions will use Sentinel 1A’s data to survey coastlines and maritime environments, watching for oil spills, tracking iceberg and ice sheet movements in shipping lanes, and detecting sea vessels.The European Maritime Safety Agency based in Lisbon, Portugal, will be one of the primary users of Sentinel 1A imagery.”EMSA is using the satellite images to detect potential threats in European waters,” said Olaf Trieschmann, senior project officer at EMSA. “People on the coastline are dependent on the environment on the coastline, and trying to reduce the impact of oil reaching the coastline is tremendous.”Anne Glover, chief scientific advisor to European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, said maritime surveillance is crucial because the oceans help regulate the world’s climate, provide a wealth of natural resources and a route for international transport. Artist’s concept of the Sentinel 1A satellite in orbit during radar mapping operations. Photo credit: ESA/ATG medialabSentinel 1A will help officials estimate ocean waves and currents and measure soil moisture, a key factor in crop security.”There’s an application that allows us to measure subsidence,” Aschbacher said. “That means if a building is sinking in by a few millimeters you can monitor this from space from 700 kilometers in orbit, which is quite amazing that you can detect such small scale changes.”Within a half-day of Sentinel 1A’s launch, the spacecraft will extend two solar panel wings to generate electricity and unfurl a 40-foot by 3-foot rectangular C-band radar antenna array comprised of 560 dual-polarized small transmitters and receivers to detect radar waves reflected from Earth’s surface.According to Levrini, ground controllers at the Sentinel operations center in Darmstadt, Germany, will switch on the radar and receive its first data Sunday, assuming an on-time launch Thursday.Officials will release the first image from the Sentinel 1A radar approximately three weeks after launch, Levrini said, and the satellite will be declared operational in July.”From July onward, we will start serving all the users,” Levrini said.By itself, Sentinel 1A will map the entire planet every 12 days and achieve full coverage of European territories in about three days. With the launch of the identical Sentinel 1B satellite at the end of 2015, the revisit time will be cut to six days globally and less than two days for Europe, Levrini said.Such a rapid revisit time is feasible because of the spacecraft’s wide viewing swath as Sentinel 1A flies through space at a speed of more than 17,000 mph, or nearly 8 kilometers per second. Its radar will scan Earth in strips as the spacecraft circles the planet from the North Pole to the South Pole in less than 100 minutes.In its most high-resolution mapping mode, the Sentinel radar returns images with a pixel size of 5 meters, or about 16 feet, with a swath width of 80 kilometers, or about 50 miles. Artist’s concept of the two Sentinel 1 satellites circling the globe to observe the entire planet every six days. Photo credit: ESA/ATG medialabBut the satellite can adjust the radar sensor to a wide-angle mode to see a strip of Earth as wide as 450 kilometers, or 280 miles, trading resolution for viewing area.”The revisit is the parameter in which all Sentinels excel,” Levrini said.European governments have spent or committed 7.2 billion euros, or about $10 billion, covering Copernicus planning and development since 1998 and satellite operations through 2020.The Sentinel satellites were conceived to be primarily operational spacecraft, extending many observations pioneered by Europe’s flagship Envisat environmental research satellite which failed in 2012.Levrini said the next Copernicus satellite set for launch is Sentinel 2A in early 2015, followed by the launch of Sentinel 3A in mid-2015. The Sentinel 2 and Sentinel 3 series of satellites are smaller than Sentinel 1 and able to fit on light-class European Vega or Russian Rockot launchers.Sentinel 2 satellites carry a multi-spectral optical camera, and the first two Sentinel 3 spacecraft will measure sea-surface topography, temperatures, and ocean and land color.A small spacecraft named Sentinel 5 Precursor is also scheduled to launch at the end of next year to bridge a data gap between the failed Envisat satellite’s atmospheric chemistry instrument and the next generation of European MetOp polar-orbiting weather observatories.Around the end of 2015, Sentinel 1B will be launched on another Soyuz rocket to join Sentinel 1A. Levrini said the Sentinel 1B schedule is holding on to a launch opportunity in late 2015, but the flight may delay to early 2016.Levrini said the Sentinel 1A satellite cost about 280 million euros, or $385 million, under current economic conditions. The mission’s launch on a Soyuz rocket cost 67 million euros, or $92 million, he said.The Sentinel 1 system’s ground segment cost about 36 million euros, or $50 million, and the twin Sentinel 1 satellites will cost a combined 28 million euros, or $39 million, to operate annually.The Sentinel 4 family includes hosted payloads on Europe’s Meteosat Third Generation geostationary weather satellites to study the atmosphere. Sentinel 1A inside an anechoic test chamber during radio frequency tests at Thales Alenia Space in Cannes, France. Photo credit: ESA/S. CorvajaOfficials say the collective observations of the Sentinel satellites and sensors will allow climate scientists, policymakers, and emergency responders to take the pulse of the planet with unparalleled precision, scope and timeliness.European officials adopted an open data policy to share measurements from the Sentinel satellites to the global community free of charge, much like the data distribution models established by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Landsat program and the U.S. Air Force’s GPS navigation constellation.”Access to data depends on two main factors,” Aschbacher said. “One is how many times does a satellite fly over a certain area. The [Sentinel 1] satellite constellation has two satellites. With two satellites you see the same spot on the Earth at least every six days at the equator, and even more frequently at mid-latitudes. This is an improvement by a factor of at least six compared to Envisat, which was our workhorse up until two years ago.”Officials also must link end users with fresh satellite data for the Sentinel observations to have the most impact for decision-makers.”The second point is how long does it take for the data after acquisition to get to the user,” Aschbacher. “There we have a very rapid data access and dissemination system put in place, which allows near real-time data to get to the user within three hours after acquisition, which is very fast.”For some specialized users, such as the European Maritime Safety Agency in Lisbon, Aschbacher said the Copernicus program developed a data stream to supply the user with imagery within 10 minutes.The Sentinel 1 satellites carry laser communications terminals to beam imagery to control centers through communications satellites in geostationary orbit, ensuring officials do not have to wait for a pass over a ground station to relay data.”Ten minutes after an image is taken of an oil spill, the images can be provided to the user and then to the coast guards to take action,” Aschbacher said.Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Europe’s Gaia mission ready for galactic survey SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: December 18, 2013 The European Space Agency is sending the $1.2 billion Gaia mission to space Thursday to catalog a billion stars, promising to be a prolific discoverer of planets, asteroids and supernovas for generations of astronomers. Artist’s concept of the Gaia spacecraft. Credit: ESAWith a billion-pixel camera at the heart of the mission, Gaia is billed as the most sensitive telescope ever put into space.Its twin telescopes will see an average of 40 million stars every day over Gaia’s five-year mission, which begins Thursday with a launch atop a Europeanized version of the Russian Soyuz rocket from the Guiana Space Center on the northern coast of South America.Built by a European consortium led by EADS Astrium, Gaia is housed inside a climate-controlled shroud at the tip of the 151-foot-tall launcher, which is on schedule to blast off at 0912:19 GMT (4:12:19 a.m. EST).Less than 42 minutes later, the launcher’s Fregat upper stage will release the 4,484-pound spacecraft on a three-week trip to an operating post at the L2 Lagrange point a million miles from Earth.Several critical deployments are programmed moments after Gaia separates from the rocket, including the unfurling of an insulating sunshield more than 34 feet in diameter. The shield keeps Gaia’s sensitive camera, the largest ever flown in space, at a chilly minus 148 degrees Fahrenheit.With the thermal insulator extended 90 degrees into its flight position, Gaia resembles the shape of a wide brim hat – its disc-shaped sunshield making up the visor and the observatory’s main body in the middle.The launch can’t come soon enough for many European scientists, who have worked on the mission for more than two decades.”This will be the first-ever map of the Milky Way in 3D,” said Gerry Gilmore, the top British scientist working on Gaia. “We’ve never had anything like this before at all. It’s a complete discovery machine.”Gilmore, one of the first scientists who proposed Gaia to ESA, is waiting to receive the first of the mission’s several petabytes of data. A petabyte is equivalent to a million gigabytes, or 200,000 DVDs.”The most challenging part we haven’t even come close to handling yet, and it’s how you actually analyze, think about and understand a dataset of a billion high-precision pieces of information, and it’s not actually a billion we’re talking about,” said Gilmore, a professor of experimental philosophy at Cambridge University. “We have a billion targets, but for most stars, we’ll not only have a proper motion, we’ll have a distance, we’ll have in many cases whether it’s got a companion or it’s got planets, we’ll know from the spectrometry what kind of a star it is, the brightest 300 million or so ones we’ll have a radial velocity, and for that same 300 million we’ll have measurements of the chemical element abundances. Depending on how you work it out, we’ll have somewhere between 12-dimensional and 26-dimensional data for these stars. And petabytes of it.” The Gaia spacecraft is enclosed inside the Soyuz rocket’s payload fairing for launch. Credit: ESA/M. PedoussautSpinning four times a day an observation point a million miles from Earth, Gaia will observe each of its billion stellar targets an average of 70 times, with each star momentarily appearing in the probe’s apertures and crossing a plane of imaging sensors embedded deep inside the spacecraft.”The estimate of the number of stars in the Milky Way is 100 to 200 billion stars, so we observe between one-half and 1 percent of these stars,” Prusti said. “Because of the completeness of Gaia to a limiting magnitude, this proving of 1 percent of these objects will help us reconstruct the remaining part. We’re not going to take a full census of the Milky Way, but we are going to look at a billion stars and we’ll have enough statistical power to deduce the structure of the Milky Way.”Gilmore said Gaia’s survey will be complete in the solar neighborhood and throughout the “spur” of the Milky Way’s spiral arm harboring the solar system. It will also peer into the galactic center to see very distant, but brilliantly bright stars thousands of light years away, yielding fresh estimates of the size of the galaxy and the mass of all the matter in the Milky Way.First proposed in the 1990s, Gaia was selected for development by ESA in 2000. It follows the European Hipparcos mission, which was the first probe to plot the positions and motions of stars – a measurement known as astrometry.Hipparcos pinpointed more than 100,000 stars, and its maps are still the gold standard used by astronomers today. Gaia will go deeper and produce more precise measurements – an improvement of a factor of 100 – allowing scientists to project the movements and locations of stars back in time to understand how the Milky Way evolved over the eons.”Gaia is like a big camera, so we have two optical telescopes and then we have the focal plane, where we detect the signal,” said Giuseppe Sarri, Gaia’s project manager at ESA. Gaia’s sunshield was deployed in a final ground test in October. Credit: ESA/M. PedoussautGaia’s two telescopes are positioned 106 degrees apart, simultaneously observing different sections of the sky in strips as the spacecraft rotates. Light from the telescopes will pass through a series of mirrors, then fall onto an array of 106 CCD detectors, comprising nearly a billion pixels with an area of 0.38 square metres, the largest imaging focal plane ever deployed in space.The sensors for Gaia’s imaging array were made by e2v in the United Kingdom.”The key technological reason we can do this job so much better is that since Hipparcos, CCDs can now be used in space, allowing us to observe many targets at the same time by imaging the sky, which gives us an advantage, together with a bigger satellite,” Prusti says. “But it’s really the detector technology that allows us to benefit from Gaia.”Gaia’s instrument, which actually serves three functions, will plot the position and movement of a star’s point light source across the plane of CCDs. Two prisms will split light into red and blue spectra, allowing researchers to use a process known as chromatic correction to ensure they know exactly a star’s color, temperature, mass and other things.To keep stable, Gaia will use an innovative micro-propulsion system with cold gas thrusters. Spinning reaction wheels or conventional rocket engines would disturb the science mission, according to Sarri.”The fundamental characteristic of Gaia is it is an extremely stable optical base telescope made of a special material called silicon carbide, and an extremely large focal plane. That is why we can measure so many stars with such precision,” said Giuseppe Sarri, Gaia’s project manager.Then comes radial velocity – what Sarri calls the fifth dimension of a star’s motion.”With the astrometric CCDs, we can measure two positions in space, the third position via the parallax, and then the true speed on the plane on the sky,” Sarri said. “But we are missing the fifth dimension, which is the radial speed, the speed of the star either approaching or receding from the spacecraft. We do this with a radial velocity spectrometer.”Gaia also promises to be a prolific discoverer of planets, asteroids and supernovas. And it could test key tenets of Einstein’s theory of general relativity.”Because Gaia is doing this totally unbiased survey, anything that looks point-like and is brighter than 20th magnitude will be observed,” Prusti said. “That means we will get a huge number of asteroids in our solar system. They come like a free bonus for Gaia. This will allow us to determine the orbits of these asteroids by orders of magnitude than can be done with ground-based observations.”Gaia will look inside Earth’s orbit and could uncover asteroids hiding from other telescopes, according to Prusti.”We are not looking directly into the sun but close enough to do something that is not possible from the ground,” Prusti said. “This will allow us to look inside Earth’s orbit, so we’ll look for asteroids that are locked in Earth-trailing or leading Lagrange point and we can make a census of what type of objects these are and how many there are.”Data collected by Gaia will also contain hints of large gas giant planets around other stars.”The sensitivity of Gaia will be high enough that we will have a census of Jupiter-sized planets around nearby stars in orbits between two to seven or eight years,” Prusti said. “That’s a parameter space that’s very poorly studied from ground based observations. We will see a star that has an extra bubble with respect to the anticipated parallax and proper motion, and from measuring that extra bubble we can deduce whether it has a companion which is another star or perhaps a Jupiter-sized planet.”Scientists expect Gaia will discover tens of thousands of brown dwarfs, or failed stars, and 20,000 supernovas. And models of the motion of stars throughout the galaxy could yield insights into the distribution of dark matter, the poorly-understand glue that binds the universe together.”It’s the first ever genuine census machine where we don’t need to know anything about what’s in the sky to start with,” Gilmore said. “That is literally the requirement. The requirement is we don’t bias ourselves with thinking we know what’s up there. We’re actually going to see what nature’s telling us. We’ll see everything.”Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.First Sentinel satellite in orbit after successful Soyuz launch SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: April 4, 2014 Europe’s first Sentinel satellite blasted off Thursday and deployed its radar antenna and solar panels overnight, inaugurating a multi-billion dollar series of satellites to take the pulse of Earth’s land surfaces, oceans and atmosphere with unmatched regularity. Liftoff of the Soyuz ST-A rocket with Sentinel 1A occurred at 6:02 p.m. local time in French Guiana. Photo credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace – Photo Optique Video du CSGFitted with a C-band radar antenna, the $383 million Sentinel 1A satellite launched at 2102:26 GMT (5:02:26 p.m. EDT; 6:02:26 p.m. local time) from the Guiana Space Center on South American’s northern coastline.A Russian Soyuz rocket boosted the spacecraft north from French Guiana, streaking through low-level clouds and into the upper atmosphere as ground-based tracking cameras recorded dazzling views of the 151-foot-tall launcher shedding its boosters and disappearing into the evening sky.The Soyuz rocket’s Fregat upper stage ignited for a 10-minute firing to put the Sentinel 1A spacecraft into a 425-mile-high orbit over Earth’s poles.The Fregat upper stage deployed the Sentinel 1A satellite about 23 minutes after liftoff. After a slight delay to receive data confirming the separation, officials declared the launch a success.”Tonight was the seventh success of Soyuz from the Guiana Space Center,” said Stephane Israel, chairman and CEO of Arianespace, operator of Soyuz missions from French Guiana. “As its heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega siblings in the Arianespace family, Soyuz provides unrivaled quality, reliability and schedule assurance to our customers.”Manufactured by Thales Alenia Space in Italy and France, the Sentinel 1A satellite is the first of five spacecraft set for launch before the end of 2015 under the auspices of the Copernicus program, a joint initiative between the European Space Agency and the European Commission, the EU’s executive body.”The launch of the Sentinel 1A satellite from the European space center marks the takeoff of the Copernicus program,” said Jose Manuel Barroso, president of the European Commission. “It’s an important step forward for the European Union.”European governments have spent or committed 7.2 billion euros, or about $10 billion, covering Copernicus planning and development since 1998 and satellite operations through 2020.The Sentinel satellites were conceived to be primarily operational spacecraft, extending many observations pioneered by Europe’s flagship Envisat environmental research satellite which failed in 2012.”Once all the Sentinel satellites have been launched, the Copernicus program will be the most efficient and fullest Earth observation program in the world,” Barroso said. “It will have specific and tangible economic, social and environmental consequences in Europe.” Artist’s concept of the Sentinel 1A satellite. Photo credit: Airbus Defence and SpaceSentinel 1A’s radar instrument, built by Airbus Defence and Space, will map the entire planet every 12 days and achieve full coverage of European territories in about three days. With the launch of the identical Sentinel 1B satellite at the end of 2015, the revisit time will be cut to six days globally and less than two days for Europe, according to Guido Levrini, manager of the Copernicus space segment for ESA.Such a rapid revisit time is feasible because of the spacecraft’s wide viewing swath as Sentinel 1A flies through space at a speed of more than 17,000 mph, or nearly 8 kilometers per second. Its radar will scan Earth in strips as the spacecraft circles the planet from the North Pole to the South Pole in less than 100 minutes.In its most high-resolution mapping mode, the Sentinel radar returns images with a pixel size of 5 meters, or about 16 feet, with a swath width of 80 kilometers, or about 50 miles.But the satellite can adjust the radar sensor to a wide-angle mode to see a strip of Earth as wide as 450 kilometers, or 280 miles, trading resolution for viewing area.”The revisit is the parameter in which all Sentinels excel,” Levrini said.The sophisticated radar antenna, comprised of five panels folded around the satellite’s main body for launch, completed a complex deployment sequence about 10 hours after liftoff.Sentinel 1A’s two solar array wings also unfurled to charge the satellite’s batteries.Engineers choreographed the deployments so the most critical steps occurred while the satellite was over ground stations, giving controllers real-time insight into the status of the spacecraft.When the antenna and arrays were extended, Sentinel 1A radioed home a “space selfie” showing one of its solar panels and half of the rectangular radar backdropped by Earth more than 400 miles below.The 40-foot by 3-foot rectangular C-band radar antenna array is comprised of 560 dual-polarized small transmitters and receivers to detect radar waves reflected from Earth’s surface. The instrument will be switched on early Sunday and ESA plans to release its first images in about three weeks.Officials expect Sentinel 1A to be returning operational data by July. A camera on-board the Sentinel 1A spacecraft took this image of the satellite’s solar panel and radar antenna Friday after completing their 10-hour deployment sequence. Photo credit: ESALevrini said the next Copernicus satellite set for launch is Sentinel 2A in early 2015, followed by the launch of Sentinel 3A in mid-2015. The Sentinel 2 and Sentinel 3 series of satellites are smaller than Sentinel 1 and able to fit on light-class European Vega or Russian Rockot launchers.Sentinel 2 satellites carry a multi-spectral optical camera, and the first two Sentinel 3 spacecraft will measure sea-surface topography, temperatures, and ocean and land color.A small spacecraft named Sentinel 5 Precursor is also scheduled to launch at the end of next year to bridge a data gap between the failed Envisat satellite’s atmospheric chemistry instrument and the next generation of European MetOp polar-orbiting weather observatories.Around the end of 2015, Sentinel 1B will be launched on another Soyuz rocket to join Sentinel 1A. Levrini said the Sentinel 1B schedule is holding on to a launch opportunity in late 2015, but the flight may delay to early 2016.The Sentinel 4 family includes hosted payloads on Europe’s Meteosat Third Generation geostationary weather satellites to study the atmosphere.Each class of Sentinel satellite — Sentinels 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 — are designed to always have two spacecraft in orbit at the same time.The satellites will collectively monitor Earth’s land surfaces, maritime zones and the atmosphere, beaming back data through a laser communications link with satellites orbiting overhead in geostationary orbit.Officials plan to provide data to users within an hour, but Copernicus will supply some expedited data to security forces, emergency responders and other institutions within minutes, if necessary.”This will be a complete coverage in every frequency band, which will be operational at the end of the decade,” said Jean-Jacques Dordain. “This first of the dedicated satellites for the Copernicus program is a major step to put it into orbit.”European officials adopted an open data policy to share measurements from the Sentinel satellites to the global community free of charge, much like the data distribution models established by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Landsat program and the U.S. Air Force’s GPS navigation constellation.”Our fellow citizens will benefit from the wide range of services to protect their environment, their quality of life and their security,” Barroso said. “For example, the data collected will contribute to the monitoring of climate change on the Earth’s surfaces, including forests and oceans. It will also provide support in emergency situations, which do not spare our continent.”Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Four satellites launched to beam Internet down to Earth SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: July 10, 2014 Four broadband communications satellites for O3b Networks, a company based in Britain’s Channel Islands with a mission to link developing countries via high-speed Internet, blasted off from French Guiana on top of a Russian Soyuz rocket Thursday. The Soyuz rocket blasts off from French Guiana with four satellites for O3b Networks. Credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace – Photo Optique Video du CSG – JM GuillonThe satellites will fly in a unique orbit 5,000 miles over the equator, reaching customers in a band between 45 degrees north and 45 degrees south latitude, home to most of the world’s population.The spacecraft host Ka-band antennas to broadcast services to customers out of reach of terrestrial broadband networks, boosting data throughput and connection speeds in homes, businesses, schools and hospitals.O3b’s name is short for the “other 3 billion,” referencing the approximate number of people without reliable, high-speed Internet connections.The company sells broadband capacity to national telecom networks, luxury cruise liners and Internet service providers, providing the backbone for widespread connectivity on ships, islands, in remote jungles and in dense urban centers.Thursday’s launch put O3b’s second set of four satellites into orbit after an initial launch in June 2013.Liftoff of the four spacecraft, built by Thales Alenia Space of France and Italy, occurred at 1855:56 GMT (2:55:56 p.m. EDT; 3:55:56 p.m. local time) from the Guiana Space Center, a European-run spaceport on the northern coast of South America.A Russian Soyuz launcher rocketed east from the space base, arcing over the Atlantic Ocean through mostly cloudy skies.The three-stage core of the venerable Soyuz rocket, which has flown more than 1,800 times since the 1950s, released a Fregat upper stage and the four O3b satellites into space less than 10 minutes after liftoff.The Fregat main engine fired four times to inject the satellites into a circular orbit about 7,830 kilometers, or 4,865 miles, above the equator.Each weighing about 700 kilograms, or 1,543 pounds, the spacecraft separated in pairs from a dispenser mounted on the Fregat upper stage. The announcement of the deployment of the last two satellites triggered a round of applause in the Jupiter control center at the Guiana Space Center.”Tonight’s launch is the second performed by Arianespace for O3b, a little more than one year after the first successful flight that marked O3b’s debut,” said Stephane Israel, chairman and CEO of Arianespace, the commercial operator of Soyuz missions from French Guiana.Thursday’s launch was the eighth mission of a Soyuz rocket from French Guiana since October 2011, when the workhorse launcher made its first flight from the tropical spaceport.”O3b is one of more than 40 new satellite operators which have trusted Arianespace to start their business,” Israel said in post-launch remarks. “Behind that trust, there is a true recognition of the reliability and availability of our launch systems.”The next Soyuz launch from French Guiana is set for Aug. 21 with two Galileo navigation satellites for the European Commission, which is building a counterpart to the U.S. Air Force Global Positioning System.”Soyuz remains the reference for satellite constellation deployment — today with O3b and soon this summer with Galileo,” Israel said.The next launch from the Guiana Space Center is scheduled for July 24, when a heavy-lifting Ariane 5 rocket will send the European Space Agency’s fifth and final Automated Transfer Vehicle on a resupply run to the International Space Station. The four O3b spacecraft mounted on a dispenser before encapsulation by the Soyuz rocket’s aerodynamic nose fairing. Credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace – Photo Optique Video du CSG – JM GuillonThe four satellites launched Thursday will enter service by Sept. 1, according to Steve Collar, CEO of O3b Networks.Jean-Lo?c Galle, president and CEO of Thales Alenia Space, said all four satellites responded to initial commands following separation from the Fregat upper stage.”I can confirm that we have heard the first cry from your four new babies,” Galle told O3b executives gathered at the French Guiana launch base.Ground controllers plan several days of testing on each spacecraft’s primary systems, then they will guide the satellites into a slightly higher orbit to enter O3b’s constellation. Officials plan about three weeks of activations and checkout of the Ka-band communications transmitters and antennas.O3b’s second launch was delayed from September 2013 after engineers discovered a problem with the power systems on the satellites launched last summer. Officials shipped the satellites from French Guiana back to their factory in Rome for repairs, and the next launch opportunity in the Soyuz rocket’s manifest was not until this summer.”Those issues really have no impact whatsoever on our customers,” Collar said in an interview Thursday. “One of the great benefits of being a constellation is that we will continue to launch satellites into the same orbit, and what we saw on the first four satellites has almost no impact on our business going forward.”But officials were eager to launch another four satellites, which will expand the reach of O3b’s broadband service and give the company more robust footing in space.”It’s important because we’re a young company, and we’re delivering genuinely different services than everyone else,” Collar said. “There’s no one else that can provide the quality connection — the fiber-like performance — that we can deliver, and still retain the flexibility of satellites. For us, it’s very important to get the satellites up there, but it’s also very important for our customers who have been waiting patiently for the service, and have been for some time.”Collar says customers are pleased with the interim capacity offered on the first four O3b satellites.”The performance has blown us way, to be honest,” Collar said. “We’re able to provide more than a gigabit [per second] per beam — the sorts of throughputs that you only normally associate with fiber. With satellites, you’re normally talking about kilobits or megabits [per second]. We’re orders of magnitude higher in terms of throughputs.”O3b has launched commercial service with three customers: Telecom Cook Islands, Digicel Papua New Guinea and Timor Telecom of East Timor.The company has launched trial service on Royal Caribbean’s Oasis of the Seas cruise liner, with full commercial service expected by the end of the year, Collar said. Artist’s concept of O3b satellites in orbit. Credit: Thales Alenia Space”With only four satellites, we have a relatively limited geography that we can actually deploy full commercial service and meet all the service level agreements that we’ve signed up to with our customers,” Collar said. “That all changes with the launch of these next four satellites.”Two more clients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Samoa are next to get O3b’s high-speed Internet service, according to Collar.Four more Thales-built O3b satellites will be ready for launch by the end of 2014, Collar said, but they are not scheduled for liftoff until early 2015.O3b officials are evaluating concepts for O3b’s next-generation satellites. The spacecraft fly in a unique, unused orbit not populated with other satellites, leaving plenty of room for growth.The O3b satellites fly four times closer to Earth than traditional telecom satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a belt 22,300 miles over the equator where a spacecraft’s orbit is locked over the same location on Earth, allowing ground antennas to remain pointed at a stable point in the sky.O3b touts its system as a low-latency, higher-speed alternative to conventional geosynchronous satellites.”We have 12 satellites initially, but we can grow to more than 100,” Collar said. “The future is very bright, and we will only be limited by the market. For the time being, we don’t see any stop in the demand for broadband connectivity, so we’re going to keep launching satellites and keep deploying services for as long as there is demand.”Collar said he was optimistic O3b would decide on a plan for more satellites by the end of the year.Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.French reconnaissance satellite launched by Soyuz SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: December 2, 2012 A reconnaissance satellite successfully launched Saturday on a Soyuz rocket, joining a twin Earth observation craft already in orbit to collect nearly 1,000 high-resolution images a day for the French armed forces and commercial customers around the world. The Soyuz rocket launched from the Guiana Space Center at 11:02 p.m. local time. Credit: ESA/CNES/ArianespaceThe craft lifted off from French Guiana on a Soyuz rocket at 0202:50 GMT Sunday (9:02:50 p.m. EST Saturday), and the launcher’s Fregat upper stage placed the satellite in an accurate orbit about 430 miles above Earth.The Fregat stage deployed its payload about 55 minutes after launch.The mission marked the fourth Soyuz launch from the Guiana Space Center, a European-run spaceport on the northeast coast of South America. The European Space Agency and the French government financed the construction of the new Soyuz launch facility, which European officials plan to exploit for commercial and institutional payloads.”This success of Soyuz confirms the reliability of the Ariane launcher family,” said Jean-Yves Le Gall, chairman and CEO of Arianespace, the commercial operator of the Soyuz rocket.The mission’s 2,138-pound satellite, named Pleiades 1B, rivals the imaging power of privately-owned spacecraft operated by GeoEye and DigitalGlobe, two firms providing commercial reconnaissance imagery to the U.S. government.Led by CNES, the French space agency, the Pleiades satellites will collect high-resolution optical imagery for military and civilian users. With additional ground processing, the satellites’ cameras have a resolution of 50 centimeters, or less than 20 inches.Up to 50 images per day from the Pleiades system will be dedicated to French defense and intelligence services, and the rest will be available to commercial users, according to French Gen. Laurent Collet-Billon, director of the military’s DGA procurement agency.French defense minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, who was in French Guiana and viewed the launch, said the launch of Pleiades 1B was “a day to remember” and would aid military operations.Together with Pleiades 1A, which launched in December 2011, the new satellite will enable global coverage every 24 hours.”Every country in the world is accessible by Pleiades in one day,” said Jean Dauphin, director of Earth observation at Astrium, the satellite’s prime contractor.CNES officials expect the two-satellite system to be fully operational in the spring of 2013.”Pleiades imagery is proving really popular, particularly with military, institutional and commercial users,” said Alain Gleyzes, Pleiades project manager at CNES. “Pleiades 1B will double the system’s capacity and provide daily revisit capability anywhere on the globe.” Artist’s concept of the Pleiades 1B satellite in orbit. Credit: EADS AstriumControl moment gyroscopes allow the Pleiades satellites to quickly pivot from one target to another, meaning the spacecraft can image multiple targets in one pass. The agility also permits the Pleiades satellites to acquire imagery for a wide-area mosaic in just a few minutes, and it can enable three-dimensional and tri-stereo image products.The Pleiades system is partially funded by Belgium, Sweden, Spain and Austria. It will complement France’s Helios government spy satellites and the Spot series of commercial imaging craft.”Fresh and frequent information is what matters most for military operations,” said Brig. Gen. Yves Arnaud, head of the French Joint Space Command. “That means getting the right imagery at the right time.”Under separate arrangements, Spain and Italy’s defense ministries will receive optical images from the Pleiades system. France and Italy have an agreement to share Pleiades imagery and radar data from Italy’s COSMO-SkyMed satellite system.Astrium Geo-Information Services has rights to sell Pleiades imagery commercially.”Pleiades is featuring the best reactivity possible in the industry, meaning the time from the programming request to delivery to the user is reduced to a minimum, thanks to a very smart design both of the space segment and of the ground segment,” said Charlotte Gabriel-Robez, Pleiades marketing manager at Astrium Geo-Information Services.Pleiades 1B was built by Astrium Satellites in Toulouse, France. Thales Alenia Space provided the satellite’s optics and other hardware.”Together with the French space agency CNES and Astrium, we are delighted to contribute to the Pleiades 1B satellite launch by providing our expertise in high-resolution optical instruments,” said Jean-Loic Galle, president and CEO of Thales Alenia Space. “Given our European leadership in high performance optical systems, and our position as a world-class supplier of space radars and altimeters, Thales Alenia Space continues to be a pivotal partner in all new Earth observation programs.”Designed for a five-year mission, the Pleiades satellites each carry a Korsch telescope built by Thales Alenia Space with a primary mirror 2.1 feet in diameter. Its CCD detectors are 40 times more sensitive to light than those in standard consumer digital cameras, according to CNES.John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Fresh cargo ship set for launch to space stationSPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: April 8, 2014 Russia is poised to deliver fresh supplies to the International Space Station on Wednesday with the launch and docking of an automated Progress cargo spacecraft.The Progress M-23M spacecraft is set for liftoff aboard a Soyuz rocket at 1526 GMT (11:26 a.m. EDT) Wednesday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.It will mark the 55th Russian Progress resupply spacecraft to launch to the space station since cargo deliveries began in 2000.Mounted on top of a three-stage Soyuz booster, the Progress spaceship is packed with more than 1,700 pounds of propellant, 926 pounds of water, 48 pounds of oxygen and more than 3,100 pounds of dry cargo comprised of spare parts, scientific experiments, food and other items for the space station’s six-man crew.The Soyuz rocket emerged from its assembly building at the Baikonur Cosmodrome before sunrise Monday on a specially-built railroad car. The rocket arrived at the launch pad by mid-morning before a hydraulic erector system lifted the unfueled rocket before work platforms were raised to encapsulate the rocket for final launch preparations.The images below show the Soyuz rocket’s rollout Monday.Liquid oxygen and kerosene propellants will be pumped into the rocket in the final hours before liftoff, which is set for 9:26 p.m. local time Wednesday.The rocket’s four strap-on boosters will shut down and fall away from the Soyuz about two minutes after liftoff. The launcher’s liquid-fueled core stage and upper stage will boost the Progress M-23M spacecraft into orbit about nine minutes into the flight.The Progress is programmed to extend its solar arrays to begin charging the craft’s batteries moments after deploying from the Soyuz rocket’s upper stage. The spacecraft will also open navigation and communications antennas shortly after the launch.After a series of engine burns to fine-tune its approach to the space station, the Progress begin its automated rendezvous sequence at 1914 GMT (3:14 p.m. EDT). The radar-guided rendezvous will culminate with a flyaround maneuver to line up with the station’s Pirs docking compartment. Docking is set for 2120 GMT (5:20 p.m. EDT), less than six hours after liftoff.The Progress M-22M spacecraft undocked from the space station Monday to clear the way for the arrival of the new unmanned supply ship. Loaded with trash, the older Progress is set for a series of experiments to help Russian engineers determine how they can better track rocket exhaust plumes from the ground.The Progress M-22M spacecraft is set for a de-orbit burn and destructive re-entry over the Pacific Ocean on April 18.

  26. Posted: August 8, 2013NOTE: GMT is 4 hours ahead of Eastern Daylight Time. Times are subject to change.Aug. 9Height Adjustment Maneuver 00137 GMT – A height adjustment maneuver, called HAM 0, will raise the HTV’s altitude by changing the ship’s velocity by 2.5 meters per second, or about 5 mph. This burn puts the spacecraft in an orbit about 5 kilometers, or 3 miles, below the International Space Station.Aug. 9Establish Proximity CommunicationsThe HTV establishes a proximity communications link with the space station when it passes within about 23 kilometers, or 14.3 miles, of the complex.Aug. 9Height Adjustment Maneuver 20443 GMT – Another major rendezvous maneuver will place the HTV about 5 kilometers, or 3 miles, behind the space station on the minus V-bar.Aug. 9Approach Initiation Point0805 GMT – The HTV departs the approach initiation point about 5 kilometers, or 3.1 miles, behind the space station. This is the starting point for the final rendezvous and approach sequence. The HTV will fly to a rendezvous insertion point around 500 meters, or 1,640 feet, directly below the station along the minus R-bar.Aug. 9Rendezvous Insertion Point0908 GMT – The HTV arrives at the rendezvous insertion point about 500 meters, or 1,640 feet, directly below the station along the minus R-bar. The ship will soon switch navigation sources from relative GPS to a rendezvous laser radar for the final approach.Aug. 9250 Meter Hold Point Arrival0929 GMT – Arriving at a programmed hold point 250 meters, or about 820 feet, below the station, the HTV pauses to conduct a “yaw around” maneuver position the ship for potential contingency abort maneuvers.After about 35 minutes of stationkeeping, the HTV resumes its approach to the station.Aug. 9250 Meter Hold Point Departure1004 GMT – After ground controllers analyze its health and performance, the HTV leaves the hold point to continue its approach to the station.Aug. 930 Meter Hold Point Arrival1033 GMT – The HTV stops at a point 30 meters, or 98 feet, below the space station. This is the final hold point to check the spacecraft’s alignment and systems before entering the capture box.Aug. 930 Meter Hold Point Departure1053 GMT – Flight controllers instruct the HTV to leave the 30 meter point and fly to a capture box about 9 meters, or 30 feet, below the space station’s Kibo laboratory module.Aug. 9Sunrise1054 GMT – The International Space Station moves into the daylight portion of its orbit.Aug. 9Capture Point1114 GMT – The HTV reaches a capture box about 9 meters, or 30 feet, directly below the station.Aug. 9Capture1129 GMT – The station’s robot arm, operated by astronaut Cady Coleman, grapples the HTV as the craft hovers about 9 meters, or 30 feet, below the complex’s Kibo module.Aug. 9Sunset1203 GMT – The International Space Station moves into the night portion of its orbit.Data Source: JAXA and NASAFinal Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA’s first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Japan dispatches delivery mission to space station SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: January 22, 2011 LOS ANGELES — Japan successfully launched a robotic spaceship Saturday with supplies to stock the International Space Station with scientific gear, spare parts and provisions for the lab’s six-person crew. The H-2B rocket launched Saturday from southern Japan. Credit: JAXAThe 35,000-pound orbital freighter blasted off aboard an H-2B rocket at 0537:57 GMT (12:37:57 a.m. EST) from Launch Pad No. 2 at the Tanegashima Space Center, an island base at the southern tip of Japan.The 186-foot-tall rocket soared into a mostly clear sky, breaking the sound barrier about a minute after setting off from its seaside launch pad. Four solid rocket boosters jettisoned two minutes into the flight, and the launcher’s twin first stage main engines cut off less than four minutes later.A hydrogen-fueled second stage placed the H-2 Transfer Vehicle in orbit and deployed the payload 15 minutes after leaving Earth. The rocket was aiming for an orbit between 124 miles and 186 miles high with an inclination angle of 51.6 degrees to the equator.The rocket’s actual orbital parameters were not immediately available, but a NASA spokesperson reported the launch was successful and said the HTV was transmitting data back to Japanese engineers in Tsukuba, a scientific hub just outside of Tokyo.”The launch vehicle flew smoothly, and, at about 15 minutes and 13 seconds after liftoff, the separation of the Kounotori 2 was confirmed,” the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said in a written statement.Japan is calling the spacecraft Kounotori 2, which means white stork.JAXA confirmed the craft was controlling its orientation in space and activating key systems in the moments after reaching orbit.The launch was delayed two days by bad weather earlier this week.Saturday’s mission is the second time Japan has launched the H-2B rocket and HTV cargo ship. JAXA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries developed both vehicles as part of their contribution to the space station program.NASA reserves room on HTV missions for U.S. equipment as part of a barter agreement in return for the space shuttle’s launch of Japan’s Kibo module, the station’s largest laboratory.The U.S. space agency provided 4,840 pounds of cargo for the HTV flight, including nearly 2,000 pounds of unpressurized gear comprising two large spare units mounted on the craft’s exposed module.Stretching 33 feet long and 14 feet wide, the unmanned cargo vessel is carrying more equipment on this flight than on its first mission in 2009. Its total cargo load amounts to nearly 8,500 pounds, according to NASA. File photo of the first HTV mission arriving at the International Space Station. Credit: NASAThe debut HTV flight had extra batteries and propellant for several key demonstrations before approaching the space station. Those have been removed from this mission.Japanese engineers optimized the interior of the spacecraft, relocating ventilation ducts and lights to free up space for more cargo. Another change allowed the HTV to carry more bags of small internal logistics items, according to JAXA.Designers also modified navigation and rendezvous software used in the HTV’s flight in space.The HTV features 57 solar panels arranged on the exterior of the ship for power production. The forward end of the craft is called the pressurized logistics carrier and the mid-section contains unpressurized cargo. The back end of the HTV is the service module housing avionics and propulsion systems.Japan is building five more HTVs for launch about once per year through about 2016. The next flight is expected in early 2012.Kounotori 2 will fire engines early Saturday to raise its orbit and set a course to approach the International Space Station. A further series of maneuvers over the next four days will set the stage for the ship’s arrival at the complex early Thursday.Four main engines and 28 maneuvering thrusters will fine-tune the HTV’s rendezvous with the station. The jets are wired to two redundant control strings.The engine burns will place the HTV in position for its laser-guided navigation system to guide the ship to a capture point about 30 feet directly beneath the outpost’s Kibo module.Astronauts Cady Coleman and Paolo Nespoli will grapple the barrel-shaped spacecraft with the lab’s robot arm and attach the ship to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module. Plans call for the HTV to be robotically captured at 1144 GMT (6:44 a.m. EST) Thursday. It should be firmly bolted to the station a few hours later.In early February, the station crew will transfer two NASA payloads from the craft’s external cargo hold. One unit is a box with electrical circuit breakers and video equipment, and another is a spare flex hose rotary coupler, a crucial component in the space station’s cooling system. The second HTV was displayed to the media in November. Credit: JAXAThe outpost’s Canadian and Japanese robot arms will pull a cargo pallet from the HTV and place it on the porch of the Kibo lab module. Dextre, a two-armed human-like robot, will move the payloads from the HTV pallet to the space station.Not all of the action will be going on outside the complex. Astronauts inside the station will also be unloading food, water, computers and tons of spare parts from the HTV’s pressurized cabin.Eight refrigerator-sized racks are inside the HTV. Two of the racks are Japanese science payloads that will go inside the Kibo module. The others are resupply racks containing a variety of equipment and supplies.Once all the cargo is removed, the crew will place trash inside the craft for disposal.The transfer work will be interrupted in late February, when the astronauts will relocate the HTV from the bottom port to the upper position on Harmony. The temporary move is scheduled for around Feb. 18, clearing room for the shuttle Discovery’s visit to the complex in late February and early March.The freighter will be returned to the Earth-facing port around March 8.The ship is scheduled to leave the station March 28 and plunge back into the atmosphere the next day, destroying the spacecraft and getting rid of the station’s waste in a fireball over the Pacific Ocean.The first half of 2011 is a busy time for the space station. At least two space shuttle visits are planned, plus Japan’s HTV and Europe’s Automated Transfer Vehicle will deliver supplies to the outpost. Soyuz capsules will come and go with crews and Progress spacecraft ferry cargo for the Russian segment of the station.The next Progress freighter is scheduled to launch Jan. 27. The European Space Agency plans to dispatch the ATV to the station Feb. 15.Late February and early March will be the only time in the station’s history that all of its existing piloted and unpiloted visiting vehicles will be present at the orbiting lab. If schedules hold, the shuttle Discovery, HTV, ATV, Soyuz and Progress spacecraft should be docked to the complex at the same time.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Japanese cargo craft reaches International Space Station SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: January 27, 2011 An automated Japanese supply ship cautiously approached the International Space Station Thursday, flying close enough for the lab’s robot arm to grapple the free-flying satellite and move it to a docking port for two months of cargo transfers. Video cameras outside the space station captured this view of the HTV poised just below the complex. Credit: NASA TVSpace station flight engineer Cady Coleman deftly guided the outpost’s mechanical arm to grab the H-2 Transfer Vehicle at 1141 GMT (6:41 a.m. EST) as the vehicles flew 220 miles over the southern Indian Ocean.”Congratulations to all of you and congratulations to the HTV flight control team,” radioed astronaut Megan McArthur from mission control in Houston. “Great work today.””Megan, we have Kounotori in our grasp,” Coleman replied. “It demonstrates what we can do when humans and robots work together. We look forward to bringing HTV 2, Kounotori, aboard the International Space Station.”Japan nicknamed the bus-sized spacecraft Kounotori, which means white stork.Three hours later, Coleman placed the 35,000-pound cargo freighter on the Harmony module’s Earth-facing docking port. Bolts engaged inside the berthing port to firmly attach the spacecraft to the complex at 1451 GMT (9:51 a.m. EST).The berthing capped a five-day chase of the space station following the HTV’s blastoff Saturday from southern Japan.The HTV cargo spacecraft, flying for the second time, delivered 8,500 pounds of spare parts, crew provisions and science gear to the station. Astronauts will open the barrel-shaped ship’s hatch at about 1230 GMT (7:30 a.m. EST) Friday to start unloading 6,455 pounds of food, water, computers, cameras and science racks from the pressurized compartment.Six refrigerator-sized racks are bolted inside the HTV, including two science experiment housings. One of the experiment racks is a Japanese gradient heating furnace designed for solidification and crystal growth research. Another rack will accommodate multiple smaller experiments. The HTV was berthed to the station’s Harmony module a few hours after capture by the robot arm. Credit: NASA TVEngineers also packed two massive spare parts units in the HTV’s external cargo carrier. It will take several days of robotics work to remove those payloads and place them on the space station’s truss backbone.The HTV is the only robotic spacecraft capable of carrying such large components to the station, and it will, at least for some time, be the only operational vehicle with such heavy-lifting capacity after the retirement of the space shuttle.An extra flex hose rotary coupler for the station’s cooling system and a cargo container with spare circuit breaker units are bolted to this mission’s external logistics pallet. This HTV hoisted 2,043 pounds of unpressurized cargo to the station, mostly for NASA.Astronauts will use the outpost’s Canadian and Japanese robot arms to pull the cargo carrier out of the HTV Feb. 1 and fasten it to the porch of the Kibo module. Mounted on the end of the station’s primary Canadian arm, a two-armed robot named Dextre will transfer the flex hose rotary coupler and cargo box to storage platforms between Feb. 2 and 4.The empty pallet will be returned to the HTV later in the mission.Thursday’s arrival marks the start of a flurry of traffic at the space station. A Russian Progress spaceship was rolled to the launch pad earlier this week. Liftoff of that craft on a Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Thursday evening, U.S. time. The Progress will dock to the station Saturday night.Europe is preparing its counterpart to the HTV – the Automated Transfer Vehicle – for launch Feb. 15 on an Ariane 5 rocket. It will reach the complex Feb. 23. Artist’s concept of the robot arm removing the HTV’s exposed cargo pallet. Credit: JAXAThen the shuttle Discovery will head to the station Feb. 24 with a permanent stowage module and more supplies.Fearing damage from the shuttle’s thruster plumes, space station managers have ordered the HTV be moved from the Harmony module’s bottom, or nadir, port to a safer position on an upward-facing port during Discovery’s visit. That robotics task is scheduled for around Feb. 18, according to a NASA spokesperson.The HTV will be moved back to the nadir berthing location after Discovery leaves.Astronauts plan to load the cylindrical spacecraft with trash before robotically removing it from the station and releasing it into space March 28. Japanese controllers will intentionally fly the HTV back into the Earth’s atmosphere the next day, destroying the craft and disposing of the station’s trash in a fireball over the Pacific Ocean.The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the 33-foot-long resupply ship for more than $700 million to fulfill part of its obligations as a space station partner. NASA reserves room for U.S. equipment on the HTV in exchange for three space shuttle missions that flew pieces of Japan’s Kibo lab to the outpost.Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. is the HTV’s prime contractor.Japan is building five more HTVs for cargo missions about once per year through 2016. The next Japanese logistics flight is scheduled for the first half of 2012.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:HTV 2 ATTACHED TO SPACE STATION DOCKING PORT VIDEO:STATION’S ROBOTIC ARM GRABS THE FREE-FLYING HTV 2 VIDEO:HTV 2 CARGO SHIP APPROACHES THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:LAUNCH OF H-2B ROCKET WITH HTV 2 FREIGHTER VIDEO:H-2B ROCKET ROLLED TO LAUNCH PAD Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA’s first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Japanese rocket launches cargo freighterSPACEFLIGHT NOW

  27. Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:BRIEFING ON TANK’S PERFORMANCE VIDEO:TANK’S ONBOARD CAMERA LIFTOFF TO SEPARATION VIDEO:FLIGHT DIRECTOR EXPLAINS INSPECTIONS VIDEO:SUNDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:LAUNCH OF ATLANTIS! VIDEO:SHEDDING FOAM MAY HAVE HIT ATLANTIS VIDEO:ONBOARD VIEW OF EXTERNAL TANK SEPARATION VIDEO:INSIDE MISSION CONTROL DURING LAUNCH VIDEO:STATION CREW TOLD VISITORS EN ROUTE VIDEO:HOUSTON RADIOS DEBRIS REPORT TO CREW VIDEO:POST-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:QUICK-LOOK BRIEFING ON DEBRIS LAUNCH REPLAYS:VIDEO:BEACH MOUND TRACKER VIDEO:CAMERA IN FRONT OF PAD VIDEO:BANANA CREEK VIEWING SITE VIDEO:VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING ROOF VIDEO:PAD 39B SIDE PERIMETER VIDEO:PLAYALINDA BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:PLAYALINDA BEACH ZOOM VIDEO:UCS 23 TRACKER VIDEO:UCS 11 TRACKER VIDEO:MISSION SPECIALIST 4 STEVE MACLEAN BOARDS ATLANTIS VIDEO:MISSION SPECIALIST 3 HEIDE PIPER BOARDS VIDEO:MISSION SPECIALIST 2 DAN BURBANK BOARDS VIDEO:MISSION SPECIALIST 1 JOE TANNER BOARDS VIDEO:PILOT CHRIS FERGUSON BOARDS VIDEO:COMMANDER BRENT JETT BOARDS VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS EMERGE FROM CREW QUARTERS VIDEO:CREW SUITS UP FOR LAUNCH TO SPACE VIDEO:FINAL INSPECTION TEAM CHECKS ATLANTIS VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS READY FOR SECOND LAUNCH TRY MORE: STS-115 patchThe official crew patch for the STS-115 mission of space shuttle Atlantis to resume orbital construction of the International Space Station.Choose your store: – – – Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA’s first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store.Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Expedition 21The official embroidered patch for the International Space Station Expedition 21 crew is now available from our stores.Hubble PatchThe official embroidered patch for mission STS-125, the space shuttle’s last planned service call to the Hubble Space Telescope, is available for purchase. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Atlantis returns from space with predawn landing BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  28. per tanti anni icona del mattino di Radio Deejay, Israele perderebbe il vantaggio di una sua risposta nucleare che in definitiva ?il suo pi?prezioso deterrente. come ?noto,Un hommage lui est rendu ce jour-l?au Stade de France avec le respect d’une minute de silence et le port d’un brassard noir en signe de deuil de la part des joueurs de l’

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